The Decision to Dilate – Retinal Physician

Date: September 1, 2022

Some patients come to your office for an eye exam and refuse to be dilated. Dilation is almost always harmless in the long term, but it does come with short-term side effects, including light sensitivity, blurry vision, difficulty driving immediately after dilation, trouble focusing on close objects, and stinging when the drops are instilled. So, it is reasonable to ask if you should insist on a dilated fundus exam (DFE) as part of a comprehensive eye exam.

This article addresses the following questions:

  • Why would you not dilate?
  • What are the arguments in favor of dilation?
  • What about imaging as an alternative to dilation?

Published in: Retinal Physician

Written by: Executive Vice-President, Suzanne Corcoran, COE

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